Journal cover Journal topic
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.883 IF 2.883
  • IF 5-year value: 3.321 IF 5-year
    3.321
  • CiteScore value: 3.07 CiteScore
    3.07
  • SNIP value: 1.336 SNIP 1.336
  • IPP value: 2.80 IPP 2.80
  • SJR value: 1.024 SJR 1.024
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 81 Scimago H
    index 81
  • h5-index value: 43 h5-index 43
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2020-60
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2020-60
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 16 Mar 2020

Submitted as: research article | 16 Mar 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal NHESS.

A Statistical Analysis of Rogue Waves in the Southern North Sea

Ina Teutsch1, Ralf Weisse1, Jens Moeller2, and Oliver Krueger1 Ina Teutsch et al.
  • 1Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht
  • 2Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency, Bernhard-Nocht-Straße 78, 20359 Hamburg

Abstract. A new wave dataset from the southern North Sea covering the period 2011–2016 and composed of wave buoy and radar measurements sampling the sea surface height at frequencies between 1.28–4 Hz was quality controlled and scanned for the presence of rogue waves. Here rogue waves refer to waves whose height exceeds twice the significant wave height. Rogue wave frequencies were analysed, compared to Rayleigh and Forristall distributions, and spatial, seasonal and long-term variability was assessed. Rogue wave frequency appeared to be relatively constant over the course of the year and uncorrelated among the different measurement sites. While data from buoys basically correspond with expectations from the Forristall distribution, radar measurement showed some deviations in the upper tail pointing towards higher rogue wave frequencies. Number of data available in the upper tail is, however, still limited to allow a robust assessment. Some indications were found that the distribution of waves in samples with and without rogue waves were different in a statistical sense. However, differences were small and deemed not to be relevant as attempts to use them as a criterion for rogue wave detection were not successful in Monte Carlo experiments based on the available data.

Ina Teutsch et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 11 May 2020)
Status: open (until 11 May 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Ina Teutsch et al.

Ina Teutsch et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 99 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
74 23 2 99 1 3
  • HTML: 74
  • PDF: 23
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 99
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 16 Mar 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 16 Mar 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 80 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 79 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 05 Apr 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Rogue waves pose a threat to marine operations and structures. Typically, a wave is called a rogue wave when its height exceeds twice that of the surrounding waves. There is still discussion on the extent to which such waves are unusual. A new data set of about 329 million waves from the southern North Sea was analyzed. While data from wave buoys mostly corresponded to expectations from known distributions, radar measurements showed some deviations pointing towards higher rogue wave frequencies.
Rogue waves pose a threat to marine operations and structures. Typically, a wave is called a...
Citation