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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2019-91
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2019-91
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 09 Apr 2019

Research article | 09 Apr 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS).

Post-event Field Survey of 28 September 2018 Sulawesi Earthquake and Tsunami

Wahyu Widiyanto1,2, Purwanto B. Santoso2, Shih-Chun Hsiao1, and Rudy T. Imananta3 Wahyu Widiyanto et al.
  • 1Department of Hydraulic and Ocean Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701, Taiwan
  • 2Department of Civil Engineering, Universitas Jenderal Soedirman, Purwokerto, 53122, Indonesia
  • 3Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), Jakarta, 10720, Indonesia

Abstract. An earthquake with a magnitude of MW = 7.5 that occurred in Sulawesi, Indonesia on September 28, 2018, triggered liquefaction and tsunamis that caused severe damage and many casualties. This paper reports the results of a post-tsunami field survey conducted by a team with members from Indonesia and Taiwan that began 13 days after the earthquake. The main purpose of this survey was to measure the runup of tsunami waves and inundation and observe the damage caused by the tsunami. Measurements were made in 18 selected sites, most in Palu Bay. The survey results show that the runup height ranged from 2 to 10 m and that the inundation distance was between 80 and 510 m. The highest runup (10.5 m) was recorded in Tondo, a complex that has many boarding houses near a university. The longest inundation distance (511 m) was found in Layana, a marketplace. The arrival times of the tsunami waves were quite short and different for each site, typically about 3–8 minutes from the time of the earthquake event. The characteristics of the damage to buildings, facilities, and structures are also summarized. Several indicators of underwater landslides are described. The survey results can be used for the calibration and validation of hydrodynamic models for tsunamis. They can also be used for regional reconstruction, mitigation, planning, and development.

Wahyu Widiyanto et al.
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Short summary
This paper reports the results of a post-tsunami field survey conducted in the disaster area of 28 September 2018 Sulawesi, Indonesia. It provides evidences covering run-up heights, inundations, tsunami arrival times, damage characteristics, and landslides. The results can be used for validation of hydrodynamic models and they contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the Sulawesi tsunami. Besides, they are important for regional reconstruction, mitigation, planning, and development.
This paper reports the results of a post-tsunami field survey conducted in the disaster area of...
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