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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2019-9
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2019-9
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 14 Feb 2019

Research article | 14 Feb 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS).

Speeding up and boosting tsunami warning in Chile

Mauricio Fuentes1, Sebastian Arriola2, Sebastian Riquelme2, and Bertrand Delouis3 Mauricio Fuentes et al.
  • 1Department of Geophysics, Faculty of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, University of Chile
  • 2National Seismological Center, Faculty of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, University of Chile
  • 3Géoazur, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur

Abstract. Chile host a great tsunamigenic potential along its coast, even with the large earthquakes occurred during the last decade, there is still a large amount of seismic energy to release. This permanent feature and the fact that the distance between the trench and the coast is just 100 km creates a difficult environment to do real time tsunami forecast. In Chile tsunami warnings are based on reports of the seismic events (hypocenter and magnitude) and a database of precomputed tsunami scenarios. However, because yet there is no answer to image the finite fault model within first minutes (before the first tsunami wave arrival), the precomputed scenarios consider uniform slip distributions. Here, we propose a scheme of processes to fill the gaps in-between blind zones due to waiting of demanding computational stages. The linear shallow water equations are solved to obtain a rapid estimation of the run-up distribution in the near field. Our results show that this linear method captures most of the complexity of the run-up heights in terms of shape and amplitude when compared with a fully non-linear tsunami code. Also, the run-up distribution is obtained in quasi real-time as soon as the seismic finite fault model is produced.

Mauricio Fuentes et al.
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Mauricio Fuentes et al.
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Latest update: 19 May 2019
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Short summary
This works provides a simple and fast approach to improve tsunami warning systems in the near field. A color-coded warning map is produced almost instantaneously after the seismic information is received. Time is crucial in the near field case, for instance, the tsunami waves generated in the chilean trench arrives at the coastline around 10–15 minutes. Seismic information takes 3–5 minutes to be ready, we produece a first warning map after 6 minutes of the earthquake origin time.
This works provides a simple and fast approach to improve tsunami warning systems in the near...
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