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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2019-67
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2019-67
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 02 May 2019

Research article | 02 May 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS).

Assessment of potential seismic hazard for sensitive facilities by applying seismo-tectonic criteria: an example from the Levant region

Matty Sharon1,2, Amir Sagy1, Ittai Kurzon1, Shmuel Marco2, and Marcelo Rosensaft1 Matty Sharon et al.
  • 1Geological Survey of Israel, Jerusalem 9371234, Israel
  • 2Porter School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel

Abstract. We present a methodology for mapping faults that constitute a potential hazard to structures, with an emphasis on special facilities such as dams and nuclear power plants. The methodology categorises faults by hierarchical seismo-tectonic criteria, which are designed according to the degree of certainty for recent activity and the accessibility of the information within a given region. First, the instrumental seismicity is statistically processed to obtain the gridded seismicity of the earthquake density and the seismic moment density parameters. Their spatial distribution reveals the zones of the seismic sources, within the examined period. We combine these results with geodetic slip rates, historical earthquake data, geological maps and other sources to define and categorise faults that are likely to generate significant earthquakes (M ≥ 6.0). Their mapping is fundamental for seismo-tectonic modelling and for PSHA analyses. In addition, for surface rupture hazard, we create a database and a map of capable faults, by developing criteria according to the regional stratigraphy and the seismotectonic configuration. The relationship between seismicity slip dynamics and fault activity through time is an intrinsic result of our analysis that allows revealing the tectonic evolution of a given region. The presented methodology expands the ability to differentiate between subgroups for planning or maintenance of different constructions or for research aims, and can be applied in other regions.

Matty Sharon et al.
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Matty Sharon et al.
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Latest update: 19 May 2019
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Short summary
We present a methodology for mapping faults that constitute far-field (ground motion) and near-field (surface rupture) hazard to structures, particularly for vulnerable facilities. For categorising faults, the criteria is adjusted to local tectonic characteristics, combining data of geological maps, instrumental seismicity, geodesy and past earthquakes. Our results adhere to international standards of hazard assessment for nuclear power plants, and improves the regional tectonic understanding.
We present a methodology for mapping faults that constitute far-field (ground motion) and...
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