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Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2019-422
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2019-422
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 03 Mar 2020

Submitted as: research article | 03 Mar 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal NHESS.

Exploring the change of Risk Perception and Adaptation Behavior among Varied Social Character Before and After Earthquake Disaster – A Case Study in Taiwan

Tzu-Ling Chen1, Tzu-Yuan Chao2, and Hao-Tung Cheng2 Tzu-Ling Chen et al.
  • 1Department of Urban Development, University of Taipei, Taipei City, 111, Taiwan
  • 2Department of Urban Planning, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan City, 701, Taiwan

Abstract. Resilience has rapidly arisen in multiple disciplines and has been regarded as the key in disaster mitigation and adaptation. Objective indicator framework is a common way evaluating resilience while limited attention on measuring subjective resilience. In fact, subjective resilience might further explain how people respond to the uncertainty of disaster risks. Due to the limitation on predicting potential earthquake events, past studies put more efforts on discussing pre-disaster. Luckily, this paper could explore the change of risk perception and adaptation behavior in types of socio-economic groups through a comparative analysis between pre- and post- earthquake disaster, and one-way analysis of variance with Post Hoc test is applied to examining the change of risk perception and adaptation behavior. The results show that female might be much willing on house retrofit due to the fear and the worrisome. However, the elders might be less aware on earthquake than the young. Education indeed affects people’s risk perception and adaptive behavior. As a whole, the results could be referred to areas clustered of male, female, elder population, and lower education population by providing risk communication, risk education, and diverse disaster adaptation options. Although limitation exists, the results of comparative analysis between pre-disaster and post-disaster conditions could be referred to adequate strategies and decide the priority of risk management policies by governments.

Tzu-Ling Chen et al.

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Tzu-Ling Chen et al.

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Short summary
The examination of pre-disaster and post-disaster could reveal how people might change on perceiving disaster and willingness of adopting adaptation approaches. The results show that female might be much willing on house retrofit while the elders might be less aware on earthquake. Knowledge-base indeed affects people’s risk perception. The findings could be referred to areas clustered of male, female, elder, and lower education population by providing diverse disaster adaptation options.
The examination of pre-disaster and post-disaster could reveal how people might change on...
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