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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2018-394
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2018-394
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Brief communication 07 Jan 2019

Brief communication | 07 Jan 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS).

Brief communication: Rethinking the 1998 China flood to prepare for a nonstationary future

Shiqiang Du1,2, Xiaotao Cheng3, Qingxu Huang4, Ruishan Chen5, Philip Ward2, and Jeroen C. J. H. Aerts2 Shiqiang Du et al.
  • 1School of Environmental and Geographical Sciences, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai, 200234, China
  • 2Institute for Environmental Studies, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 1081 HV, the Netherlands
  • 3China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, Beijing, 100038, China
  • 4State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes & Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, China
  • 5School of Geographic Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai, 200241, China

Abstract. A mega-flood in 1998 caused tremendous losses in China, and triggered large investments in flood risk management (Bryan et al., 2018). However, rapid urbanization and climate change pose new challenges and it is time to rethink whether China is prepared for the next mega-flood. In China’s fast growing economy, with rapid urbanization, novel flood risk management approaches are required in addition to reinforcing structural protection, such as levees. These include a risk-based urban planning and a coordinated water governance system with public participation.

Shiqiang Du et al.
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Status: open (until 04 Mar 2019)
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Short summary
A mega-flood in 1998 caused tremendous losses in China, and triggered large investments in flood risk management. However, flood memory change over time while rapid urbanization and climate change pose new challenges. Novel flood risk management approaches are thus required in addition to reinforcing structural protection, such as levees. These include a risk-based urban planning and a coordinated water governance system with public participation.
A mega-flood in 1998 caused tremendous losses in China, and triggered large investments in flood...
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