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Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2018-363
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2018-363
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 07 Dec 2018

Research article | 07 Dec 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS).

Regional Interaction Frameworks to Support Multi-Hazard Approaches to Disaster Risk Reduction (With an Application to Guatemala)

Joel C. Gill1, Bruce D. Malamud2, Edy Manolo Barillas3, and Alex Guerra Noriega4 Joel C. Gill et al.
  • 1Global Geoscience, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, NG12 5GG, UK
  • 2Department of Geography, King's College London, London, WC2B 4BG, UK
  • 3UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, Guatemala City, Guatemala
  • 4Instituto Privado de Investigación sobre Cambio Climático, Guatemala City, Guatemala

Abstract. Here we present an interdisciplinary approach to developing comprehensive, systematic and evidenced regional interaction frameworks to support multi-hazard approaches to disaster risk reduction. We apply this approach in Guatemala, developing regional interaction frameworks for national and sub-national (Southern Highlands) spatial extents. The regional interaction frameworks are constructed and populated using five evidence types: (i) publications and reports (internationally accessible) (93 peer-review and 76 grey literature sources); (ii) publications and reports (locally accessible civil protection bulletins) (267 bulletins from 11 June 2010 to 15 October 2010); (iii) field observations; (iv) stakeholder interviews (19 semi-structured interviews) (v) stakeholder workshop results (16 participants). These five evidence types were synthesised to determine an appropriate natural hazards classification scheme for Guatemala, with 6 natural hazard groups, 19 hazard types, and 37 hazard sub-types. For a national spatial extent in Guatemala, we proceed to construct and populate a regional interaction framework (matrix form), identifying 50 possible interactions between 19 hazard types. For a sub-national spatial extent (Southern Highlands of Guatemala), we construct and populate a regional interaction framework (matrix form), identifying 114 possible interactions between 33 hazard sub-types relevant in the Southern Highlands. We also use this evidence to explore networks of multi-hazard interactions and anthropogenic processes that can trigger natural hazards. We present this information through accessible visualisations to improve understanding of multi-hazard interactions in Guatemala. We believe that our regional interaction frameworks approach to multi-hazards is scalable, working at global to local scales with differing resolutions of information. Our approach can be replicated in other geographical settings, with regional interaction frameworks helping to enhance cross-institutional dialogue on hazard interactions, and their likelihood and potential impacts.

Joel C. Gill et al.
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Joel C. Gill et al.
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Short summary
This paper describes a replicable approach to characterising relationships between natural hazards. Guatemala is exposed to multiple natural hazards, which do not always occur independently. There can be interactions between natural hazards. For example, one hazard may trigger multiple secondary hazards, which can subsequently trigger further hazards. Here we use diverse evidence of such interactions to construct matrices of hazard interactions in Guatemala at national and sub-national scales.
This paper describes a replicable approach to characterising relationships between natural...
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