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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2018-222
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 27 Aug 2018

Research article | 27 Aug 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS).

Field survey of the 2017 Typhoon Hato and a comparison with storm surge modeling in Macau

Linlin Li1, Jie Yang2,3, Chuan-Yao Lin4, Constance Ting Chua5, Yu Wang1,6, Kuifeng Zhao2, Yun-Ta Wu2, Philip Li-Fan Liu2,7,8, Adam D. Switzer1,5, Kai Meng Mok9, Peitao Wang10, and Dongju Peng1 Linlin Li et al.
  • 1Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • 2Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • 3College of Harbor, Coastal and Offshore Engineering, Hohai University, China
  • 4Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan
  • 5Asian School of the Environment, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • 6Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
  • 7School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, USA
  • 8Institute of Hydrological and Ocean Research, National Central University, Taiwan
  • 9Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Macau, Macau, China
  • 10National Marine Environmental Forecasting Center, Beijing, China

Abstract. On August 23, 2017 a Category 3 Typhoon Hato struck Southern China. Among the hardest hit cities, Macau experienced the worst flooding since 1925. In this paper, we present a high-resolution survey map recording inundation depths and distances at 278 sites in Macau. We show that one half of the Macau Peninsula was inundated with the extent largely confined by the hilly topography. The Inner Harbor area suffered the most with the maximum inundation depth of 3.1m at the coast. Using a combination of numerical models, we simulate and reproduce this typhoon and storm surge event. We further investigate the effects of tidal level and sea level rise on coastal inundations in Macau during the landfall of a Hato like event.

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Short summary
Typhoon Hato was one of the most damaging natural disaster events in the Western Pacific region in 2017. It caused the the worst flooding in Macau since its instrumental records began in 1925. We present a high-resolution survey map recording inundation depths and distances at 278 sites in Macau. We provide a series of inundation maps under different tidal and sea levels. The maps highlight adaptive strategies are certainly required in order to keep up with the pace of rising sea level.
Typhoon Hato was one of the most damaging natural disaster events in the Western Pacific region...
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