Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.281 IF 2.281
  • IF 5-year value: 2.693 IF 5-year 2.693
  • CiteScore value: 2.43 CiteScore 2.43
  • SNIP value: 1.193 SNIP 1.193
  • SJR value: 0.965 SJR 0.965
  • IPP value: 2.31 IPP 2.31
  • h5-index value: 40 h5-index 40
  • Scimago H index value: 73 Scimago H index 73
Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2018-110
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 24 Apr 2018

Research article | 24 Apr 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS).

Extreme water levels, waves and coastal impacts during a severe tropical cyclone in Northeast Australia: a case study for cross-sector data sharing

Thomas R. Mortlock1,2, Daryl Metters3, Joshua Soderholm4, John Maher3, Serena B. Lee5, Geoffrey Boughton6, Nigel Stewart4, Elisa Zavadil7, and Ian D. Goodwin2 Thomas R. Mortlock et al.
  • 1Risk Frontiers, St Leonards, 2065, Australia
  • 2Department of Environmental Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, 2109, Australia
  • 3Coastal Impacts Unit, Department of Environment and Science Queensland Government, Deagon, 4017, Australia
  • 4Fugro Roames, Runcorn, 4113, Australia
  • 5Griffith Centre for Coastal Management, Griffith University, Gold Coast 4215, Australia
  • 6Cyclone Testing Station, James Cook University, Douglas, 4811, Australia
  • 7Alluvium, Cremorne, 3121, Australia

Abstract. Severe Tropical Cyclone (TC) Debbie made landfall on the north Queensland coast of Australia on 27 March 2017 after crossing the Great Barrier Reef as a slow-moving Category 4 system. Groups from industry, government and academia collected coastal hazard and impact data before, during and after the event and shared this data to produce a holistic picture of TC Debbie at the coast. Results showed the still water level exceeded the highest astronomical tide by almost a metre. Waves added a further 16 percent to water levels along the open coast, and were probably unprecedented for this area since monitoring began. In most places, coastal barriers were not breached and as a result there was net offshore sand transport. If landfall had occurred two hours earlier with the high tide, widespread inundation and overwash would have ensued. This paper provides a case study of effective cross-sector data sharing in a natural hazard context. It advocates for a shared information platform for coastal extremes in Australia to help improve the understanding and prediction of TC-related coastal hazards in the future.

Download & links
Thomas R. Mortlock et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Thomas R. Mortlock et al.
Thomas R. Mortlock et al.
Viewed
Total article views: 277 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
210 60 7 277 4 4
  • HTML: 210
  • PDF: 60
  • XML: 7
  • Total: 277
  • BibTeX: 4
  • EndNote: 4
Views and downloads (calculated since 24 Apr 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 24 Apr 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)
Total article views: 277 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 272 with geography defined and 5 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited
Saved
No saved metrics found.
Discussed
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 16 Jul 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Tropical Cyclone (TC) Debbie crossed the northeast coast of Australia on 27 March 2017. A multi-sector consortium collected data throughout the event to produce a holistic picture of hazards and impacts at the coast. While water levels and waves were unprecedented for this area since monitoring began, TC Debbie can be regarded a near-miss in terms of widespread coastal flooding. This work provides a rare case study of cross-sector data sharing in a natural hazard context in Australia.
Tropical Cyclone (TC) Debbie crossed the northeast coast of Australia on 27 March 2017. A...
Citation
Share