Journal cover Journal topic
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2017-49
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
09 Feb 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS).
Using street view imagery for 3D survey of rock slope failures
Jérémie Voumard1, Antonio Abellan1,2, Pierrick Nicolet1,3, Marie-Aurélie Chanut4, Marc-Henri Derron1, and Michel Jaboyedoff1 1Risk analysis group, Institute of Earth Sciences, FGSE, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
2Scott Polar Research Institute, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
3Geohazard and Earth Observation team, Geological Survey of Norway (NGU), Norway
4Groupe Risque Rocheux et Mouvements de Sols (RRMS), Cerema Centre-Est, France
Abstract. We discuss here the challenges and limitations on surveying rock slope failures using 3D reconstruction from images acquired from Street View Imagery (SVI) and processed with modern photogrammetric workflows. We show how the back in time function can be used for a 3D reconstruction of two or more image sets from the same site but at different instants of time, allowing for rock slope surveying. Three sites in the French alps were selected: (a) a cliff beside a road where a protective wall collapsed consisting on two images sets (60 and 50 images on each set) captured on a six years timeframe; (b) a large-scale active landslide located on a slope at 250 m from the road, using seven images sets (50 to 80 images per set) from five different time periods with three images sets for one period; (c) a cliff over a tunnel which has collapsed, using three images sets on a six years time-frame. The analysis includes the use of different commercially available Structure for Motion (SfM) programs and comparison between the so-extracted photogrammetric point clouds and a LiDAR derived mesh used as a ground truth. As a result, both landslide deformation together with estimation of fallen volumes were clearly identified in the point clouds. Results are site and software-dependent, as a function of the image set and number of images, with model accuracies ranging between 0.1 and 3.1 m in the best and worst scenario, respectively. Despite some clear limitations and challenges, this manuscript demonstrates that this original approach might allow obtaining preliminary 3D models of an area without on-field images. Furthermore, the pre-failure topography can be obtained for sites where it would not be available otherwise.

Citation: Voumard, J., Abellan, A., Nicolet, P., Chanut, M.-A., Derron, M.-H., and Jaboyedoff, M.: Using street view imagery for 3D survey of rock slope failures, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2017-49, in review, 2017.
Jérémie Voumard et al.
Jérémie Voumard et al.
Jérémie Voumard et al.

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We discuss here the challenges and limitations on surveying rock slope failures using 3D reconstruction from images acquired from Street View Imagery (SVI) and processed with modern photogrammetric workflows. Despite some clear limitations and challenges, this manuscript demonstrates that this original approach might allow obtaining preliminary 3D models of an area without on-field images. Furthermore, the pre-failure topography can be obtained for sites where it would not be available otherwise.
We discuss here the challenges and limitations on surveying rock slope failures using 3D...
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