Journal cover Journal topic
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2017-440
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
05 Jan 2018
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS).
Economic damage and spill-overs from a tropical cyclone
Manfred Lenzen1, Arunima Malik1, Steven Kenway2, Peter Daniels3, Ka Leung Lam2, and Arne Geschke1 1ISA, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
2School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072, Australia
3School of Environment, Griffith University, Brisbane, 4222, Australia
Abstract. Tropical cyclones cause widespread damage in specific regions as a result of high winds, and flooding. Direct impacts on commercial property and infrastructure can lead to production shortfalls. Further losses can occur if business continuity is lost through disrupted supply of intermediate inputs from, or distribution to, other businesses. Given that producers in modern economies are strongly interconnected, initially localised production shortfalls can ripple through entire supply-chain networks and severely affect the regional and wider national economy. In this paper, we use a comprehensive, highly disaggregated, and recent multi-region input-output framework to analyse the impacts of Tropical Cyclone Debbie. In particular, we show how industries and regions that were not directly affected by storm and flood damage suffered significant job and income losses. Our results indicate that the disaster resulted in the direct loss of about 7,000 full-time equivalent jobs and 2 billion AUD of value added, and an additional indirect loss of 5,000 jobs and 1 billion AUD of value added. We are able to conduct this assessment so rapidly due to the timely data provision and collaborative environment facilitated by the Australian Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory (IELab).
Citation: Lenzen, M., Malik, A., Kenway, S., Daniels, P., Lam, K. L., and Geschke, A.: Economic damage and spill-overs from a tropical cyclone, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2017-440, in review, 2018.
Manfred Lenzen et al.
Manfred Lenzen et al.
Manfred Lenzen et al.

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Short summary
We use the Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory to analyse the impacts of Tropical Cyclone Debbie on the Australian economy. We show that industries and regions that were not directly affected by storm and flood damage suffered significant job and income losses. In particular, our results indicate that the disaster resulted in the direct loss of about 7,000 full-time equivalent jobs and 2 billion AUD of value added, and an additional indirect loss of 5,000 jobs and 1 billion AUD of value added.
We use the Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory to analyse the impacts of Tropical Cyclone...
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