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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2017-365
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 27 Oct 2017

Research article | 27 Oct 2017

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS). A final paper in NHESS is not foreseen.

1997 Typhoon Linda Storm Surge and People's Awareness 20 Years Later: Uninvestigated Worst Storm Event in the Mekong Delta

Hiroshi Takagi1, Le Tuan Anh1, and Nguyen Danh Thao2 Hiroshi Takagi et al.
  • 1Tokyo Institute of Technology, School of Environment and Society, Tokyo, Japan
  • 2Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam

Abstract. Typhoon Linda (1997) was the worst storm in the Mekong Delta. However, very little scientific information is available. Of the last 228 storms to make landfall in Vietnam, this tropical cyclone took the southernmost course, and the estimated reoccurrence period is once in 150 years or longer. Our analysis reveals that the storm surge reached 1.5-m high along the eastern coast of the low-lying delta, and it even propagated until the regional capital of Can Tho, which is located 80-km inland from the river mouth. Despite the fact that local people in Can Tho still clearly remember Linda after almost 20 years, curiously all of the interviewees replied, I am not afraid of a typhoon. On the other hand, the islanders of Con Dao, which was directly impacted by Linda, acknowledged a high degree of awareness of typhoon disasters. This study demonstrates that only a memory of the past significant event does not necessarily improve people's awareness. Because the delta was a nearly uninhabited mangrove jungle before the 20th century, this particular typhoon event needs to be better studied to envisage a future catastrophic gray swan event.

Hiroshi Takagi et al.
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Hiroshi Takagi et al.
Hiroshi Takagi et al.
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Short summary
Typhoon Linda (1997) was the worst storm in the Mekong Delta. However, very little scientific information is available. Of the last 228 storms to make landfall in Vietnam, this tropical cyclone took the southernmost course, and the estimated reoccurrence period is once in 150 years or longer. Because the delta was a nearly uninhabited mangrove jungle before the 20th century, this particular typhoon event needs to be better studied to envisage a future catastrophic gray swan event.
Typhoon Linda (1997) was the worst storm in the Mekong Delta. However, very little scientific...
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