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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2017-323
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 15 Sep 2017

Research article | 15 Sep 2017

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript was accepted for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS).

Improvement of an index oriented methodology for consequence analysis of natural hazards: application to the Upper Guil Catchment (Southern French Alps)

Benoît Carlier1, Anne Puissant2, Constance Dujarric1, and Gilles Arnaud-Fassetta1 Benoît Carlier et al.
  • 1Université Paris-Diderot (Paris 7), Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR 8586 PRODIG, 5 rue Thomas Mann, 75013 Paris, France
  • 2Université de Strasbourg, UMR 7362 LIVE, 3 rue de l'Argonne, 67000 Strasbourg, France

Abstract. Vulnerability is a complex concept involving a variety of disciplines from physical and socio-economic sciences. Currently, two opposite trends exist: the physical approach in which vulnerability is analysed as potential impacts on the exposed elements; and the social approach in which vulnerability is viewed as a combination of socio-economic variables determining people’s ability to anticipate before a catastrophic event, to react during it, and to recover after it. Finding a way to combine these two approaches is a key issue for a global vulnerability assessment. The objective of this paper is to improve the Potential Damage Index (Puissant et al., 2013) originally developed to assess the physical, structural and functional consequences of landslide hazard, by including social and institutional criteria. These criteria, derived from INSEE French census data and risk perception survey were selected to represent the three main phases of risk management: preparedness, crisis management and recovery. The new Global Potential Damage Index is then applied on the Upper Guil Catchment to assess torrential floods. Results of the PDI are compared with the GPDI and show significant differences. GPDI scores are globally lower than PDI scores indicating that resilient population may qualify results obtained for physical consequences.

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Short summary
The objective of this research is to improve an index originally developed to assess physical consequences of a considered hazard, by including socio-economic characteristics of population information. Data from the French Census data and a survey on risk perception (questionnaires) were used to propose an index taking into account the three main phases of risk management: preparedness, crisis management and recovery.
The objective of this research is to improve an index originally developed to assess physical...
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