Journal cover Journal topic
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2016-206
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
20 Jun 2016
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS). The revised manuscript was not accepted.
Hydrodynamic characterization of past flash-flood events and their associated hazards from dendrogeomorphological evidence in Caldera de Taburiente National Park (Canary Islands, Spain)
Julio Garrote1, Andrés Diez-Herrero2, José M. Bodoque3, María A. Perucha2, Pablo Mayer4, and Mar Genova5 1Department of Geodynamics, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, E-28040, Spain
2Geological Survey of Spain (IGME), Ríos Rosas 23, Madrid, E-28003, Spain
3Mining and Geological Engineering Department, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, E-45071, Spain
4Department of Geography, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, E-35003, Spain
5Forest Engineering Technic School, Technic University of Madrid, Madrid, E-28040, Spain
Abstract. Las Angustias river is an ungauged stream located in the Caldera de Taburiente National Park (La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain), where frequent intense flash-flood events occur, sometimes with fatal consequences (4 deaths, November 2001) and considerable financial implications (over 700 000 euros in recent years). The aim of this research is to analyse the flood hazard at the Playa de Taburiente, one of the most popular sites in this protected area, with more than 60 000 visitors per year. The use of classic data sources and hydrological or hydraulic modelling methods for flood hazard analysis has important limitations in this area because of incomplete precipitation and flow data information and low representative values of the statistical time series, which may lead to under- or over-estimated results. Alternative or complementary data sources and methods including palaeohydrological techniques can therefore be used here for flood hazard analysis. A detailed dendrogeomorphological study of the river system was carried out using Canarian pine trees located on the stream bed and river bank with external evidence of flash-flood damage, including scars and exposed roots. The preliminary results identify and date at least eight winter flood events between 1962–1963 and 2011–12. In spite of the uncertainties deriving from the incomplete precipitation data and the mobile alluvial riverbed, the models provide an estimate of past flood discharge magnitudes. E.g. for the 1997 flood event a 1235 m3 s-1 flood minimizes the RMSE over the disturbed tree sample; furthermore, this flow value clearly exceeds the return period considered and means a distinct behavioral change in this gorge, from a braided channel with emerged bars to a single channel occupying the whole river bed. These numerical results and maps could improve flood hazard and risk analysis and should be useful for the national park land use management and visitors planning.

Citation: Garrote, J., Diez-Herrero, A., Bodoque, J. M., Perucha, M. A., Mayer, P., and Genova, M.: Hydrodynamic characterization of past flash-flood events and their associated hazards from dendrogeomorphological evidence in Caldera de Taburiente National Park (Canary Islands, Spain), Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2016-206, 2016.
Julio Garrote et al.
Julio Garrote et al.

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The paper shows a study assessing different flooding scenarios based on the height of scars in trees as indicators for peak discharge estimation in an ungauged fluvial basin with sand and gravel riverbed. The use of scars on trees together with the combined use of 2D hydraulic model and LIDAR topographic data, has allowed a better peak discharge estimation of January, 11–13, 1997 flash flood and its related hazards, than estimation from rainfall data. This could improve flooding risk mapping.
The paper shows a study assessing different flooding scenarios based on the height of scars in...
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