Journal cover Journal topic
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
doi:10.5194/nhess-2017-37
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
02 Feb 2017
Review status
A revision of this discussion paper was accepted for the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS) and is expected to appear here in due course.
A numerical study of tsunami wave run-up and impact on coastal cliffs using a CIP-based model
Xizeng Zhao1, Yong Chen1, Zhenhua Huang2, and Yangyang Gao1 1Ocean College, Zhejiang University, Zhoushan Zhejiang 316021, China
2Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA
Abstract. There is a general lack of the understanding of tsunami wave interacting with complex geographies, especially the process of inundation. Numerical simulations are performed to understand the effects of several factors on tsunami wave impact and run-up in the presence of submarine gentle slopes and coastal cliffs, using an in-house code, named a Constrained Interpolation Profile (CIP)-based model in Zhejiang University (CIP-ZJU). The model employs a high-order finite difference method, the CIP method as the flow solver, utilizes a VOF-type method, the Tangent of hyperbola for interface capturing/Slope weighting (THINC/SW) scheme to capture the free surface, and treats the solid boundary by an immersed boundary method. A series of incident waves are arranged to interact with varying coastal geographies. Numerical results are compared with experimental data and good agreement is obtained. The influences of submarine gentle slope, coastal cliff and incident wave height are discussed. It is found that the rule of tsunami amplification factor varying with incident wave is affected by angle of cliff slope, and there is a critical angle about 45°. The run-up on a toe-erosion cliff is smaller than that on a normal cliff. The run-up is also related to the length of submarine gentle slope with a critical about 2.292 m in the present study. The impact pressure on the cliff is extremely large and concentrated, and the backflow effect is nonnegligible. Results of our work are in high precision and helpful in inversing tsunami source and forecasting disaster.

Citation: Zhao, X., Chen, Y., Huang, Z., and Gao, Y.: A numerical study of tsunami wave run-up and impact on coastal cliffs using a CIP-based model, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., doi:10.5194/nhess-2017-37, in review, 2017.
Xizeng Zhao et al.
Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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RC1: 'title', Anonymous Referee #1, 02 Mar 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC3: 'Reply to reviewer 1', Xizeng Zhao, 30 Mar 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Comments to Authors', Anonymous Referee #2, 02 Mar 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Reply to reviewer 2', Xizeng Zhao, 30 Mar 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
AC1: 'Reply to reviewer 1', Xizeng Zhao, 30 Mar 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Xizeng Zhao et al.
Xizeng Zhao et al.

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Short summary
Numerical simulations are performed to understand the effects of several factors on tsunami wave impact and run-up in the presence of submarine gentle slopes and coastal cliffs using an in-house code. The run-up on a toe-erosion cliff is smaller than that on a normal cliff. Two impact pressure peaks exist during the tsunami wave run-up and impact. One is the direct impact pressure when tsunami waves first hit the coastal cliff, and the other is caused by the backflow from the cliff run-up.
Numerical simulations are performed to understand the effects of several factors on tsunami wave...
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